How to plan the perfect walk-in wardrobe


In a time when clever storage is trendy and being uber-organised is an asset, who doesn’t dream of having their own beautifully laid out walk-in wardrobe?

No more grabbing at clothes shoved willy nilly into a tall boy or scrabbling for shoes under the bed – walk-in wardrobes can streamline everything you need into one glamorous space.

And these days, a spacious walk-in wardrobe is becoming less of a luxe option reserved for the rich and more of a standard addition in new builds and renovated houses.

But it’s not as simple as chucking rails and drawers up in a room, there is a science to designing the perfect walk-in wardrobe.

No more grabbing at clothes shoved willy nilly into a tall boy or scrabbling for shoes under the bed - walk-in wardrobes can streamline everything you need into one glamorous space.

istock

No more grabbing at clothes shoved willy nilly into a tall boy or scrabbling for shoes under the bed – walk-in wardrobes can streamline everything you need into one glamorous space.

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Christchurch-based Simply Wardrobes manager Patrick Quinlivan said the walk-in wardrobe was the third-most important part of the house, after the kitchen and ensuite, so it was important not to skimp on the budget or layout.

A walk-in wardrobe needs to comfortably house everything from underwear to three-piece suits.

Knowing how to fit together all the different elements that will house an entire wardrobe, often for two people, can be quite a complex puzzle and care needs to be taken at the design stage.

It’s a space that is used multiple times a day, often under time pressure while rushing to get ready for work, or get the kids ready for school.

These days, a spacious walk-in wardrobe is becoming less of a luxe option reserved for the rich and more of a standard addition in new builds and renovated houses.

istock

These days, a spacious walk-in wardrobe is becoming less of a luxe option reserved for the rich and more of a standard addition in new builds and renovated houses.

Quinlivan said a key feature for a perfect walk-in was having a special place for every category of clothing.

“You should have a drawer, or two or three, for your workout clothes, for lingerie and undergarments. Same for your handbags and jewellery,” he said.

This way there would be no confusion as to where to put things away.

“That’s where people get a little lost, they have all this stuff and don’t know what to do with it,” he said.

Little things like mirrors, hooks and hangers were key elements of the perfect walk-in wardrobe too, Quinlivan said.

A walk-in wardrobe needs to comfortably house everything from underwear to three-piece suits.

Unsplash/Paseidon72

A walk-in wardrobe needs to comfortably house everything from underwear to three-piece suits.

Having all of the same hangers was also a quick and cheap way to beautify any wardrobe space.

Pull-out swivel mirrors were the best for space-saving and were cost effective, while pull-out valet hooks were an often overlooked but ideal addition, and helpful for packing, unpacking and deciding what to wear every day, he said.

Piles of disorganised clothes and shoes can bring unnecessary stress and anxiety to the simple daily tasks of getting dressed and undressed.

And therein lies the magic of a streamlined and well-organised space that caters to everything you might need, it can instil calm and order.

Ample storage in a walk in wardrobe ensures every item of clothing has its own place.

Unsplash/Burgess Milner

Ample storage in a walk in wardrobe ensures every item of clothing has its own place.

Quinlivan said knowing how many metres of short-hanging rails and long-hanging rails to put in was as simple as hanging up the clothes and measuring the space needed.

With drawers, he recommended going away from large deep drawers and opting for more shallow ones to save on stressful rummaging around time.

Treasured items like handbags and jewellery were often overlooked but needed their own designated spot in the wardrobe too.