Migrant centre surveys organisations on language support needs


Aoraki Migrant Centre support case manager Mandy Wills, left, and migrant support manager Katy Houstoun have sent out surveys to South Canterbury organisations to find out their interpreter and language needs.

Bejon Haswell/Stuff

Aoraki Migrant Centre support case manager Mandy Wills, left, and migrant support manager Katy Houstoun have sent out surveys to South Canterbury organisations to find out their interpreter and language needs.

To find out what the language needs are of organisations dealing with people who have English as a second language in South Canterbury the Aoraki Migrant Centre has sent out a survey.

Centre support case manager Mandy Wills said there was no one thing that prompted the questionnaire sent to all organisations and groups on its database.

“We see the need for interpretation to help assist South Canterbury services dealing with our clients, and wanted to understand who else needs interpretation services, and how often they would use these services.”

She said the number of migrants and former refugees had been increasing in South Canterbury and they wanted to ensure that the appropriate language support services were in place for those who needed it.

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The survey asks how communication is undertaken with people who struggle with English, the language barriers they face, and their need for language support services.

It asks the respondent for suggestions on how such language needs in the community could be addressed.

Celebrating Waitangi Whanau Fun Day hosted by Te Aitarakihi Trust and the Aoraki Migrant Centre in February.

JOHN BISSET/STUFF

Celebrating Waitangi Whanau Fun Day hosted by Te Aitarakihi Trust and the Aoraki Migrant Centre in February.

”Depending on the results, we could look at creating a database of people who could interpret, for what languages (are needed), and see any gaps that we need to fill,” Wills said.

She said they did not not want people to miss out on services because of language issues.

“We want to work together to help support those who speak English as a second language.”

The Aoraki Migrant Centre was established in 2014 to promote goodwill, raise awareness, provide intercultural understanding and highlight the needs of the migrant community.